Core Bamboo: A New Kind of Bowl

We were fortunate enough to be born into a more privileged environment. We view it as our responsibility to help those who weren’t.

Those words come straight from Core Bamboo’s website. The business, which sells dining, prep, and serving equipment made from organically grown bamboo, employs more than 2,000 employees around the world. These artisans and their communities all benefit from Core Bamboo’s presence, which might provide anything from medical opportunities to recreation.

Although it doesn’t necessarily seem like the go-to material for creating dishes, Core Bamboo has created several successful lines which include everything from napkin rings and pepper shakers to knives and bowls. Bamboo is lightweight, strong, naturally anti-microbial, and regenerative, making it a perfect candidate for reusable dishware. A simple hand wash using warm water and soap will keep pieces clean, and Core Bamboo suggests a light rubbing with food safe mineral oil to regenerate a tired-looking bowl.

In addition to knowing that every bowl comes from a sustainable grass rather than glass or wood, buyers will also be excited to know that these eco-friendly items also look great. Whether it’s a basic bamboo finish, a smooth solid coat of paint, or the elegant zebra-like stripes created by crushed bamboo, these items make a simple yet intriguing aesthetic statement.

The entire collection can easily be ordered directly from Core Bamboo’s website. Shops like Macy’s and Kitchen Couture also carry some pieces.

It’s Organic!

Photography by Selina Kade-Poff

These days it seems like the only thing people aren’t growing at home, is money.  With the buzz around the U.S. about eating, growing, and processing ‘organic’ food, could it really be better for you? Maybe cheaper? Or simply does it taste a little better than normally processed food, and where do you buy it? A-lot of people ask themselves the same questions.

To start off, organic foods are grown and prepared completely and entirely different.  While traditional growing habits are involved with the use of numerous chemicals, organic growing techniques stray from that sense.  With the only added unnatural ingredient being elbow grease, many people look to organic foods as a safer alternative to typical dining choices. There is no use of herbicide, or chemical fertilizer,  in the organic growing process, and while antibiotics and growing hormones are widely used in original methods, grazing that is rotated and access to the outdoors are preventative measures to prevent disease in livestock; also the use of organic feed!

Organoleptic value is a system to show how organic food is experienced by the senses for example: taste, sight, smell , touch. Organic food tends to have a better shelf life, this probably due to the higher level of antioxidants, and a lower level of nitrates which make fruit and vegetables age quicker. Also studies have shown that the higher the crop yield, the lower amount of antioxidants in the crop. This is why most people, when put to a blind taste test, will choose organic fruits and veggies showing that they have a higher organoleptic value.

Photography by Selina Kade-Poff

Now where can I buy organic foods and will they but a whole in my pocket?  As the nation grows more aware of organic foods, expect to see it in all types or grocery stores along with standalone stores that specialize in just organic products.  Although the dramatic differences in growing techniques, the prices for organic fruits and vegetables are roughly the same. For non organic apples at a supermarket expect to pay around $3.99 per pound, while organic apples would be placed at $4.49, so expect somewhat of a price hike, but nothing that will break the bank.  Organic foods are  becoming more accessible, cheaper, abundant so we may see some families start to take a more natural approach to cooking and eating once exposed to it.