Chambre De Sucre

Have you ever wanted your food dishes to look like something that came out of a cooking magazine? Enhance the look of your cuisines with gourmet sugar from Chambre De Sucre. While it’s French in name, the product comes from Japan. It’s handmade by one of the oldest family industries in the country. With over two hundred and seventy years of tradition, and even providing the Royal Japanese families with their products, quality is undoubtedly guaranteed. Chambre De Sucre offers sugar balls designed for coffee drinks and pieces in bright, spring-like colors. For $13.95 (before S&H), a canister of sugary bites can be your own. For $20 to $40, larger collections of confectionary desserts are available. These sugars will sweeten tea parties, bridal showers or ceremonies. Use them to add elegance to any dessert or give them as a gift to the aspiring chef you know.

You don’t have to go to culinary school to create beautiful cooking. Just add a little appealing saccharine from Chambre De Sucre to your dessert or drink. You’re sure to impress any food critic with them. I feel a sugar rush just looking them! Add some to your kitchen cupboard by purchasing from ChambreDeSucre.com.

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Steve Jobs Biography by Walter Isaacson

Author Walter Isaacson is known for publishing biographies of the long-dead geniuses, Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin, tackled the task of producing the biography of Steve Jobs. The biography ‘Steve Jobs’ reaches out to current and future generations to explain the fascinating life of Steve Jobs. Using forty self-conducted interviews, along with interviews from family, friends, colleagues and even competitors.

Isaacson has written about the roller-coaster life of the creative perfectionist with a ferocious drive. Jobs cooperated with this book, asking for no control over what was written about him. He encouraged everyone to speak honestly, for a complete and accurate biography. He spoke candidly, and almost brutally honest about those that he worked with and competed against.

Critic Jane Maslin says, “Mr. Isaacson’s long view basically puts Mr. Jobs up there with Franklin and Einstein.” It’s a portrait of his legacy, and a story of how Jobs overcame skeptics and obstacles in the technology industry. Most importantly, it tells who he is as a man.